Fire Safety and Prevention is in Your Hands

How to Use a Fire Extinguisher Remember the word P.A.S.S PULL -Place the extinguisher on the floor. Hold it by the tank (pressure on the handle could pinch the pin). Pull the pin straight out. AIM -Start 10 feet back from the fire. Aim at the base of the fire. SQUEEZE -Squeeze the lever on the fire extinguisher SWEEP -Sweep from side to side, moving in slowly until the fire is out.

How to Use a Fire Extinguisher
Remember the word P.A.S.S
PULL – Place the extinguisher on the floor. Hold it by the tank (pressure on the handle could pinch the pin). Pull the pin straight out.
AIM – Start 10 feet back from the fire. Aim at the base of the fire.
SQUEEZE – Squeeze the lever on the fire extinguisher
SWEEP – Sweep from side to side, moving in slowly until the fire is out.

Last night’s 4-Alarm Fire in the Mission was tragic as one person lost their life and dozens were left without a home.   As fire investigators determine what happened it is important to remember that there are simple things you can do prevent a fire in your home.   Here are a few:

  • Never leave candles unattended.
  • Don’t overload extension cords.
  • Never leave food on the stove or in the oven unattended.
  • Always unplug small appliances when they are not in use to prevent overheating as well as conserving electricity.
  • Keep combustibles away from space heaters or other heat producing appliances.
  • Allow sufficient space around computers to let them vent properly.
  • Keep your eyes open! If your lights dim every time you plug something in, it could be a sign something is wrong. Likewise, if your circuit breaker keeps tripping, then you should call an electrician to help you.
  • If you see a fire starting at a wall outlet, pull the plug out of the wall and turn off the power to the outlet. Then call 9-1-1.  It is important you do not put water on an electrical fire as this only make things worse.

Finally, remember that smoke alarms should be installed inside every bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level.  Test all smoke alarms at least once a month and replace batteries every six months; however, we recommend upgrading to an extended life smoke alarm (for example: 10 year smoke alarm).

Ready for more?   The San Francisco Fire Department has additional resources to educate yourself and others about fire safety.  Visit www.sf72.org  or take the City’s free Neighborhood Emergency Response Team (NERT) training to prepare for any emergency.

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Posted on January 29, 2015, in Preparedness and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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